Production of Mo and Ru Isotopes in Neutrino-driven Winds: Implications for Solar Abundances and Presolar Grains

J. Bliss1, A. Arcones1,2, and Y.-Z. Qian3,4
Astrophysical Journal 866, 105 Link to Article [DOI: 10.3847/1538-4357/aade8d]
1Institut für Kernphysik, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Schlossgartenstr. 2, Darmstadt D-64289, Germany
2GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstr. 1, Darmstadt D-64291, Germany
3School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA
4Tsung-Dao Lee Institute, Shanghai 200240, People’s Republic of China

The origin of the so-called p-isotopes ${}^{\mathrm{92,94}}\mathrm{Mo}$ and ${}^{\mathrm{96,98}}\mathrm{Ru}$ in the solar system remains a mystery, as several astrophysical scenarios fail to account for them. In addition, data on presolar silicon carbide grains of type X (SiC X) exhibit peculiar Mo patterns, especially for ${}^{\mathrm{95,97}}\mathrm{Mo}$. We examine the production of Mo and Ru isotopes in neutrino-driven winds associated with core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe) over a wide range of conditions. We find that proton-rich winds can make dominant contributions to the solar abundance of ${}^{98}\mathrm{Ru}$ and significant contributions to those of 96Ru, 92Mo, and 94Mo. In contrast, neutron-rich winds make negligible contributions to the solar abundances of 92,94Mo and cannot produce 96,98Ru, whereas the early ejecta of CCSNe can make dominant contributions to the solar abundance of 92Mo. Furthermore, we show that some neutron-rich winds can account for the peculiar Mo patterns in SiC X grains. Our results can be generalized if conditions similar to those studied here are also obtained for other types of ejecta in either CCSNe or neutron star mergers.

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