Localized equilibrium and mineralogic effects on trace element distribution and mobility in highly metamorphosed eucrite Elephant Moraine (EET) 90020

1,2,3J.S.Gorce,1,2D.W.Mittlefehldt,2J.I.Simon
Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta (in Press) Link to Article [https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gca.2022.08.034]
1Lunar and Planetary Institute, USRA, TX 77058, USA
2Center for Isotope Cosmochemistry and Geochronology, Astromaterials Research Office, NASA/Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX 77058, USA
3Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Department of Earth and Environmental Science, Troy, NY 12180
Copyright Elsevier

Eucrites exhibit a range of igneous and metamorphic textures and geochemistries that can be used to study the evolution of early planetary differentiation and crust formation in the solar system. We integrated petrologic/textural observations, in-situ geochemical analyses, and thermodynamic modeling to explore the petrogenesis of Elephant Moraine (EET) 90020, an unbrecciated meteorite. We identified microdomains that record relatively high metamorphic temperatures and concluded that diffusion processes likely modified EET 90020 during and/or after peak thermal conditions. There is little evidence that partial melting caused the distribution of minor and trace elements within or among the microdomains. Trace element linear transect measurements within the microdomains imply that phosphate minerals strongly controlled trace element distributions throughout the sample. The discrepancy between the observed metamorphic textures, major element chemistry, and the trace element distributions is a consequence of differing chemical mobility. Multiple processes are influencing geochemistry within a single sample which has implications for the development of petrogenetic models that seek to reconcile the differences observed between eucrite geochemical groups.

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