Impact cratering: The South American record—Part 2

1A.P.Crósta,2,3W.U.Reimold,4M.A.R.Vasconcelos, 2N.Hauser, 1G.J.G.Oliveira, 1M.V.Maziviero, 5A.M.Góes
Chemie der Erde (in Press) Link to Article [https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chemer.2018.09.002]
1State University of Campinas, Brazil
2University of Brasília, Brazil
3Natural History Museum—Leibniz Institute for Evolution and Biodiversity Research, Berlin, Germany
4Federal University of Bahia, Brazil
5University of São Paulo, Brazil
Copyright Elsevier

In the first part of this review of the impact record of South America, we have presented an up-to-date introduction to impact processes and to the criteria to identify/confirm an impact structure and related deposits, as well as a comprehensive examination of Brazilian impact structures. The current paper complements the previous one, by reviewing the impact record of other countries of South America and providing current information on a number of proposed impact structures. Here, we also review those structures that have already been discarded as not being formed by meteorite impact. In addition, current information on impact-related deposits is presented, focusing on impact glasses and tektites known from this continent, as well as on the rare K–Pg boundary occurrences revealed to date and on reports of possible large airbursts. We expect that this article will not only provide systematic and up-to-date information on the subject, but also encourage members of the South American geoscientific community to be aware of the importance of impact cratering and make use of the criteria and tools to identify impact structures and impact deposits, thus potentially contributing to expansion and improvement of the South American impact record.

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