Space weathering effects in Diviner Lunar Radiometer multispectral infrared measurements of the lunar Christiansen Feature: Characteristics and mitigation

1Paul G. Lucey, 2Benjamin T. Greenhagen, 3Eugenie Song, 4Jessica A. Arnold, 1,5Myriam Lemelin, 4Kerri Donaldson Hanna, 4Neil E. Bowles, 6Timothy D. Glotch, 7David A. Paige
1Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, University of Hawaii at Manoa, 1680 East West Road, Honolulu 96822, HI USA
2Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, 11101 Johns Hopkins Rd. Laurel 20723, MD USA
3Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Drive Pasadena Mail Stop 264-623, CA 91109 USA
4Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU, United Kingdom
5Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Hawaii at Manoa, 1680 East West Road, Honolulu 96822, HI, USA
6Department of Geosciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-2100, USA
7Dept. of Earth, Planetary and Space Science, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles 90095, CA USA

Multispectral infrared measurements by the Diviner Lunar Radiometer Experiment on the Lunar Renaissance Orbiter enable the characterization of the position of the Christiansen Feature, a thermal infrared spectral feature that laboratory work has shown is proportional to the bulk silica content of lunar surface materials. Diviner measurements show that the position of this feature is also influenced by the changes in optical and physical properties of the lunar surface with exposure to space, the process known as space weathering. Large rayed craters and lunar swirls show corresponding Christiansen Feature anomalies. The space weathering effect is likely due to differences in thermal gradients in the optical surface imposed by the space weathering control of albedo. However, inspected at high resolution, locations with extreme compositions and Christiansen Feature wavelength positions–silica-rich and olivine-rich areas–do not have extreme albedos, and fall off the albedo- Christiansen Feature wavelength position trend occupied by most of the Moon. These areas demonstrate that the Christiansen Feature wavelength position contains compositional information and is not solely dictated by albedo. An optical maturity parameter derived from near-IR measurements is used to partly correct Diviner data for space weathering influences.

Reference
Lucey PG, Greenhagen BT, Song E, Arnold JA, Lemelin M, Donaldson Hanna K, Bowles NE, Glotch TD, Paige DA (2016) Space weathering effects in Diviner Lunar Radiometer multispectral infrared measurements of the lunar Christiansen Feature: Characteristics and mitigation. Icarus (in Press)
Link to Article [doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2016.05.010]
Copyright Elsevier

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